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<  Gear Talk  ~  kick drum recording

fumigate
Posted: Tue May 11, 2010 11:19 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 30 Jan 2008 Posts: 579 Location: o-town
in post production, anyone have any tricks for making the kick stand out more?? cut through the mix better??

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FUMIGATION
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tormentinfire
Posted: Wed May 12, 2010 6:41 am Reply with quote
Resident troll Joined: 08 Feb 2007 Posts: 5005 Location: East Germany
Compression - a typical setting to emphasize the clicky part would be threshold -12db to -18db, attack 40-75ms, release 100-300ms, ratio 4:1 to 8:1. All this will depend on the volume of the kick and how it sounds in general but that should get you started. You can also always thumb through the presets, there's usually a kick compression preset.

EQ would be the next step. The part of the kick that stands out is mid-high range. You want to avoid boosting any one specific frequency, and you'll want a fairly wide bell shape to whatever you're boosting. A good way to do it is to make a 6-9 db bump and sweep it across the mid to high frequencies (after 1khz). You should be able to hear different parts of the kick get more audible. Once you find something that works, leave the boost there and reduce it to 3-6db or so. You can do this a few times, boosting suitable frequencies as you see fit, as if you just pick one part of the kick to emphasize it might sound weird.

One more thing that is commonly done is putting a hi pass filter on the bass, at about 40hz or a bit higher...this clears up some low end for the kick, but you might not want to do this depending on how bassy your kick is. Worth a try though.

tl;dr
compress, eq to emphasize parts of the kick that will make it easier to hear in the mix, cut some bass from the bass to make room for the kick (if suitable)

edit: I should clarify, all this applies to editing the kick separately from the mix (as in applying the comp and eq directly to the kick track). If you're talking about making the kick louder in an already mixed down track, your only choice is creative eq'ing and there's only so much you can do there.
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Rise_of_the_wicked
Posted: Wed May 12, 2010 9:19 am Reply with quote
Joined: 10 Feb 2007 Posts: 3168 Location: On me ship, harr!
if you wanna be lazy, you can record two tracks, and beat the crap out of one of them :p

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carnada
Posted: Wed May 12, 2010 12:18 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 13 Mar 2008 Posts: 470
you could use 2 mics. one very close to the head and anotherone around the middle
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tormentinfire
Posted: Wed May 12, 2010 12:40 pm Reply with quote
Resident troll Joined: 08 Feb 2007 Posts: 5005 Location: East Germany
carnada wrote:
you could use 2 mics. one very close to the head and anotherone around the middle


post production =/= mic set up
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ogdeathgrind
Posted: Wed May 12, 2010 1:18 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 16 Oct 2008 Posts: 2337 Location: http://ogdg.proboards.com
i like psp vintage warmer...
http://www.pspaudioware.com/plugins/index.html

you could also replace the kick sound entirely with drumagog. matt knows how to use that.

http://www.drumagog.com/
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descending
Posted: Wed May 12, 2010 2:47 pm Reply with quote
Site Admin Joined: 07 Feb 2007 Posts: 666 Location: mechanicsville
ogdeathgrind wrote:


you could also replace the kick sound entirely with drumagog. matt knows how to use that.

http://www.drumagog.com/


eww.. i couldn't imagine doing that to anything i've ever done

i'd rather have a nice sounding drum to begin with then have it digitally replaced

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ogdeathgrind
Posted: Wed May 12, 2010 2:52 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 16 Oct 2008 Posts: 2337 Location: http://ogdg.proboards.com
that's not always possible. You need a high quality kick, skin, mic, preamp in order to achieve a high quality kick sound. At least this program offers a solution to those who can't afford the costs of a pro studio setup.
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descending
Posted: Wed May 12, 2010 3:12 pm Reply with quote
Site Admin Joined: 07 Feb 2007 Posts: 666 Location: mechanicsville
ogdeathgrind wrote:
that's not always possible. You need a high quality kick, skin, mic, preamp in order to achieve a high quality kick sound. At least this program offers a solution to those who can't afford the costs of a pro studio setup.


I'd say you need a good quality skin - you can make any drum sound good with the right tuning

you an rent decent mics from long & mcquade for not much money (if you were doing it yourself)
or there's lots of hobby recording studios who could probably cut you a deal if you were just doing drums

but overall i think tormentinfire answered fumigate's question

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kamanda
Posted: Wed May 12, 2010 4:31 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 11 Oct 2008 Posts: 519
In PP you could run a virtual trigger and have it run WITH the original track. this gives you the more "real" sound with the added attack and precision of the sample.

TIF put some great advice their too.

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tormentinfire
Posted: Wed May 12, 2010 8:10 pm Reply with quote
Resident troll Joined: 08 Feb 2007 Posts: 5005 Location: East Germany
Honestly, if the kick sound is shit from the get go, you would be better off using drumagog or something - but any kick will need some eq and comp to make it stick out in a mix so you have to ask yourself, is my source sound good enough to "fix" or am I just polishing a turd?
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fumigate
Posted: Wed May 12, 2010 10:10 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 30 Jan 2008 Posts: 579 Location: o-town
you said turd.

good advice though...the original kick isn't horrible, but i eventually gave up and already tried a few different drumagog samples but i only really have one thats is OK...but i'll go back a try out some stuff rom your 1st post...

in the meantime does anyone have any good drumagog kick samples they can throw my way???

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Rise_of_the_wicked
Posted: Wed May 12, 2010 10:18 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 10 Feb 2007 Posts: 3168 Location: On me ship, harr!
gotta ask yourself what the goal of the recording is first. Wink

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tormentinfire
Posted: Thu May 13, 2010 6:36 am Reply with quote
Resident troll Joined: 08 Feb 2007 Posts: 5005 Location: East Germany
I have some drumkit from hell samples, the one the meshuggah guy did, that are pretty good. I can put up some of the kicks when I get home later.
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ogdeathgrind
Posted: Thu May 13, 2010 12:20 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 16 Oct 2008 Posts: 2337 Location: http://ogdg.proboards.com
descending wrote:
ogdeathgrind wrote:
that's not always possible. You need a high quality kick, skin, mic, preamp in order to achieve a high quality kick sound. At least this program offers a solution to those who can't afford the costs of a pro studio setup.


I'd say you need a good quality skin - you can make any drum sound good with the right tuning

you an rent decent mics from long & mcquade for not much money (if you were doing it yourself)
or there's lots of hobby recording studios who could probably cut you a deal if you were just doing drums

but overall i think tormentinfire answered fumigate's question


you still need a good preamp.
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